MOTORCYCLES

Building a Norton Four

In the mid-1960s, there were no 4-cylinder motorcycles to buy, so riders made...

The Current: E-MTB With Hall of Famer Joe Murray

Mountain Bike Hall of Famer Joe Murray plays an important role in developing...

The Current: Moto-E World Cup To Race Energica Egos

MotoGP gets a new category in 2019, the Moto-e World Cup, with bikes provided by...

The Ride: Speedway Superstar

Ehinger Kraftrad’s remarkable ‘Speedster’; history through a hi-tech lens....

Road Test: 1929 BMW R16

The BMW R16 is legendary for its Art Deco styling, but how is it to ride?

The Current: HPC Revolution

Hi-Power Cycles have launched a 60mph E-Bike. Technically, that's a motorcycle,...

Road Test: Münch Mammut

What's the biggest motorcycle available in the early 1970s like to ride? The...

The Current: Confederate No More – Meet the Curtiss Motorcycle

After 25 years, Confederate Motors sheds its controversial a name, and the...

The Ride: Bryan Fuller’s ‘Bavarian Knight’

Fuller Moto nails a vintage BMW cafe racers style with a modified R75/5 'toaster...

The Ride: Piyush and Nishanth – Avoid IT

Two young Indian mechanical engineers decided they'd rather build a custom bike...

The Current: Saroléa is Alive and Electric

Words: Gaz Boulanger. Photos: Mirco Lazzari Joseph Saroléa established his arms factory in Liège in 1850, and like many manufacturers of the era evolved his company into a bicycle maker in the early 1890s. His sons bolted a 1.5-hp 247cc engine to a Royale Saroléa bicycle, and were soon exporting their race-winning motorcycles to Italy. By 1910 they sold 10,000 bikes, mainly V-twins. Times were good for the Belgian maker throughout the early part of the 20th century, but like many of its European contemporaries, the `60s proved difficult,...

The Current: Future-Proof (Part 1)

How will the motorcycle become safer in the future? Editor of 'The Current',...

California Dunes Riding in the 1960s

Bill Greene's father documented his British motorcycle rides in the California...

Glenn Curtiss: 136mph in 1906?

A Scientific American article from 1906 explains Glenn H. Curtiss' 136.3mph...