As part of the buildup to our Electric Revolution Live event in May 2022, we are ramping up reportage on the EV scene.  It’s an ever-evolving, even frantic, landscape of electric vehicles, and it can be tough to keep abreast of all the latest bikes, batteries, and news constantly flooding the market. That’s why we’ve re-launched our weekly EV News Roundup to bring you cherry-picked stories that matter to you.

From the affordable and super durable SONDORS Metacycle EV bike that features hub motor technology designed to eliminate the common chain/belt final drive (a frustration to many of you traditional riders, we know!) to batteries that promise to charge to 80% in just 30 minutes, here are our picks for the most buzzworthy EV stories of the week!

The SONDORS Metacycle Will Soon Be Hitting the Market

The Sondors is a sleek, modern design with sufficient identity to stand out in the market, and very reasonably priced.  ‘Cost of entry’ is second only to ‘range’ on the list of gripes for potential e-bike buyers. [Sondors]
Priced to please at $5,000, the SONDORS Metacycle electric motorcycle is swiftly approaching its Q3 2021 shipping date. Durable enough for the daily commuter, the Metacycle delivers up to 80 miles on a single charge and can hit top speeds of 80 mph. While that won’t win this utilitarian bike any trophies on the racetrack, its affordable price-tag is sure to be appealing for the average rider who is looking for a highway-capable EV bike. The Metacycle offers hydraulic brake locks, a digital full color display, adjustable suspensions, and a rear hub motor. SONDOR’s motor choice is in stark contrast to the mid-mounted motor that most electric motorcycle manufacturers opt for. This streamlines the bike and eliminates the need for extra components, dropping the Metacycle’s price exponentially.

Husqvarna Unveils Its First EV Street Bike

The E-Pilen concept has been on display since Spring, but it’s looking ever more likely to enter the market in 2021. [Husqvarna]
With the public hungry for more EV options, many motorcycle manufacturers are desperately trying to keep up with the demand. Husqvarna is no exception. Known for its high-quality off-road bikes, the company is now shifting its focus to the EV sector with the release of its first EV concept, the Husqvarna E-Pilen. Fans of the brand’s Vitpilen or Svartpilen gas-powered motorcycles will already by familiar with the E-Pilen’s styling. The concept sports a similar body and panels that will contain three removable battery packs that promise a range of 62 miles.

Stand-up electric scooters are among the most popular EVs on the planet, and almost disposable in urban areas. Still, Husqvarna sees a potential for the market in personal mobility. [Husqvarna]
The E-Pilen is the first in a long line of EV projects by Husqvarna’s parent firm, Pierer Mobility. The company plans to release a variety of electric motorcycles and scooters built on a 48-volt platform, with powers spanning from 4kw to 11kw.  Their Vektorr scooter and Bltz stand-up electric scooter fill out their upcoming EV lineup.

At Energica, Shorter Charging Times Are Around the Corner

The stunning Energica Ego cafe racer built by DeBolex Engineering for our Electric Revolution exhibit at the Petersen Museum in 2019, the ‘TW Steel Oil in the Blood’ custom. [Tom Homa]
If you ask any gas-powered motorcycle enthusiast why they aren’t keen on making the transition to electric bikes, they’ll quickly cite refueling and range as their largest discouragers. But this could all change soon.  Our friends at Energica Motor Company, an Italian manufacturer of electric motorcycles, have already implemented faster charging for their model lines, including the CHAdeMO standard for the Japanese market.  But, according to the company’s CTO, Giampiero Testoni, even swifter charging times will be arriving soon.

In a recent interview with Visordown, Testoni stated, “Of course, there was already a Japanese standard, but we were the first to start on a European standard, enabling charging to 80% in half an hour. In real use, when you stop for refueling, you go and drink some coffee, 20 minutes, it’s very easy to reach that target.”  While this is a good start, Testoni believes that an 85% charge in just 15 minutes is completely achievable in the very near future.

An EV Ducati?!

Italjet harkens back to the era of the Wedge with their concept for an EV Ducati, a retro-futuristic shape reminiscent of deTomaso’s designs for Benelli’s 250-4, and Giorgetto Giugiaro’s boxy 860GT of 1975, which was a flop, it should be noted.  Car designers never seem to nail it with the motorcycle crowd, who seem to prefer substance over styling. [Italdesign]
A company hailed for having a combustion-engine soul, Ducati is becoming increasingly involved in e-bicycles. However, a recent electric motorcycle concept dubbed the “Ducati 860-E Concept” could soon plunge the Italian company into the world of EV bikes. Created by Italdesign, a company that has a long-standing relationship with Ducati and even collaborated with them to designed the firm’s Urban-E electrical bicycle, the 860-E draws inspiration from the 1970s L-twin to convey a neo-retro model of a Ducati electric motorcycle.T he concept’s circular headlights, arching tank, and gilled side covers all pay tribute to Ducati’s distinct visual trademarks. Other features will include LED lighting, dual-mount front brakes, and an inverted front-end.

Ghanain Teenager Builds Solar-Powered Wooden Scooter from Scrap

Samuel, a 17-year old student in Ghana, gained insta-fame last week for his home-built, solar-powered electric scooter, built entirely from scrap wood and discarded parts.  The scooter charges its battery from a small solar panel on the back, uses very low-draw LED lights front and rear, and incorporates the small electric motor from his mother’s sewing machine!  The scooter is totally functional, and captured global attention after a Ghanaian YouTube star (Efo Selasi) featured him on his channel.  Now we wonder, how can we get this young man a scholarship for the engineering school he is so clearly ready for?

 

 

Stephanie Weaver is a Philadelphia-based freelance writer. When she’s not locked to her laptop, she can be found riding horses and motorcycles.